Americans love to hear about point systems. After all, many involve us earning desirable rewards, discounts, and freebies. However, not all point systems are about earning something desirable.

In most states, you earn points on your driver's license after being ticketed for moving violations like running a red light or stop sign, illegal u-turns, unsafe lane changes, and so forth. While no driver relishes the thought of paying moving violation tickets, the financial implications are actually much broader when the points accumulate. This could be in the form of higher insurance premiums or even the suspension of your driving privileges. The details of the point system vary by state. For example, some states assess points to drivers that are at fault in an auto accident. That said, most point systems will assess points one of two ways:

1. One point per basic moving violation, with two points being assessed for speeding violations that involve the driver substantially exceeding the posted speed limit. Drivers assessed either eight points over three years, six points over two years, or four points over one year will have their license suspended.

2. Two points for incidences like slightly breaking the speed limit, an illegal turn, or other minor driving violation. Drivers with more serious moving violations, such as running a red light or stop sign, will be assessed three to five points. Drivers that are assessed 12 points within a three year period will have their license suspended.

Should you get a moving violation ticket, you'll want to look for the vehicle code violation number on the front of your ticket and contact your state department of motor vehicles. Be sure to ask the number of points, if any, the violation carries; how many points you already have; and how many points will result in a license suspension.

These points can cause your insurance premiums to increase by 20% to 30%. Most insurers will regularly review the driving records for all their customers. Depending on your insurer's policy and state's laws, some insurers may be able to raise your premiums for just a single point. Most insurers will allow one moving violation every couple of years before they raise your premiums, but check with your insurer to determine their specific policy.

Can I Avoid/Remove Points?

You can contest the ticket. This may be especially prudent if your points are nearly suspension levels. Keep in mind that contesting the ticket is an iffy proposition in that avoiding the point will depend on you being successful.

An option that offers more certainty in avoiding the point is paying the ticket and attending traffic school. However, some jurisdictions will not allow anyone ticketed for driving fifteen m.p.h. or more over the speed limit to attend traffic school. If you're eligible, then you may need to attend anywhere from once a year to once every two years, depending on your jurisdiction. Some states will require a court appearance or visit to the court's clerk to enroll in the class, while other traffic schools are completed online. Some traffic schools give you the basic information with a splash of humor to make it less boring, while others may require you to sit through eight hours of lecture and films on gruesome accidents. In any case, it shouldn't be too big a sacrifice when you consider the alternative higher insurance premiums from the point(s) going on your record.

Driver education courses, such as a defensive driving class, can help you remove existing points from your license. The department of motor vehicles for your state can give you a listing of applicable options.

In closing, insurers typically either avoid risk or charge exorbitant premiums to take it on. Having a number of moving violations is a strong indicator that you have habits that could lead to costly accidents and claims, and would therefore be a risk to insure. Most insurers do understand that humans err occasionally, but you'll have the best chance at keeping your rates down by avoiding traffic violations altogether.